Throwback Thursday: ‘The Copper Scroll’ by Joel C. Rosenberg

Joel Rosenberg The Copper scrollMost people are very familiar with the archaeological discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls.  They were found by shepherds in caves located in Qumran, back in 1947. But few know that another discovery was made in those same caves, five years later.

In 1952, a copper scroll was found. Now, keep in mind that the Dead Sea Scrolls contained some of the oldest prints of books that make up the bible–including the oldest known copy of the book of Isaiah–which were written on parchment or sheepskins. If something so important, like books of the bible, were preserved on parchment or sheepskins, what in the world could be important enough to be engraved on copper?

It took scientists almost four years, thanks to nearly two thousand years of oxidation, to find a way to open the copper scroll without damaging it so badly it would be unreadable. Once it was opened… well, here’s a real headline from the New York Times on June 1, 1956: “Dead Sea Scrolls Tell of Treasure.”

The Story 

The Copper Scroll is the forth novel in Rosenberg’s Last Jihad series, taking place after The Last Jihad, The Last Days and The Ezekiel Option–and follows series protagonists Jon Bennett and Erin McCoy. 

The book begins with Jon and Erin’s wedding. Jon, a former Senior Advisor to the president, and Erin, a former operative with the CIA, have both given up their careers to get married and spend the rest of their lives together. The two have already been through a lot at this point in the series, and both figured it was time to settle down. 

Several wedding guests are forced to leave the service early after an explosion rocked the streets of Washington, D.C., close to the White House. Those guests all worked for the government, which tipped off Jon and Erin to the fact that something terrible must have happened. At first they tried to stay out of it, but eventually get pulled in when a close friend and mentor of theirs survives an assassination attempt just long enough to share some secret information that he wants them to follow-up on. 

The duo discovers that there’s more to the explosion that took place near the White House than anyone could have ever expected. The bombing wasn’t random, and the White House wasn’t even the primary target–it was all a cover to hide the real target, a person closing in on an important discovery. 

Jon and Erin soon find themselves on a hunt for the greatest treasure the world has ever known, braving an Indiana Jones-type adventure through Israel as their pursuers follow close behind with sinister intentions. The hunt is for hidden artifacts from the bible days–treasures that, if found, could lead to the building of a third Jewish temple.

Rosenberg takes readers on an action-packed ride through the Holy Land in thrilling and suspenseful fashion in one of his best novels to date. Trust me, once you start this book, you won’t be able to put it down. 

Why I Loved it

Rosenberg is an expert at developing characters over the course of a novel series. He’s done it with this cast, then again in his Twelfth Imam series and in his current series starting with The Third Target. Yet out of all the compelling characters he’s created over his career as a bestselling novelist, Jon Bennett and Erin McCoy are my very favorites. 

Why you should read it

The Copper Scroll is Joel Rosenberg at his very best, and a must-read for fans of historical fiction or spy-type adventures. If you like Raiders of the Lost Ark or National Treasure, you’ve got to check out this book!

Book Details

Author: Joel C. Rosenberg 

Pages: 384 (Hardcover)

Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers 

Release Date: August 1, 2006 (Order now!)

 

 

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